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Old 08-18-2011, 06:05 AM
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Question
Smart-Fly Super Switch

If a failure occurs, does the Smart-Fly Super Switch fail to a closed circuit condition? This is important to me because I do not want a switch failure to cause an open circuit such that I lose the use of my receiver battery redundancy.

Thank you!
Bill(aka Smacka)
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Old 08-18-2011, 09:04 AM
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They don't say it is, but I don't know for sure. You can check out the Fromeco line of switches as they offer failsafe Wolverine and Badger switches
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Old 08-18-2011, 09:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smacka View Post
If a failure occurs, does the Smart-Fly Super Switch fail to a closed circuit condition? This is important to me because I do not want a switch failure to cause an open circuit such that I lose the use of my receiver battery redundancy.

Thank you!
Bill(aka Smacka)
The super switch is not a failsafe switch. It will fail "open" which is not what you are looking for.
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Old 08-18-2011, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by ericb View Post
The super switch is not a failsafe switch. It will fail "open" which is not what you are looking for.
Thank you! I had suspected so because that is a feature that you would expect to be showcased in the specs
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Old 08-19-2011, 09:23 AM
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Hi,
The SuperSwitch is a mechanical switch and if a mechanical switch fails, it fails open. This is why you always run two mechanical switches, one for each battery. I will say that we have been selling these since 2003 and have had zero failures to my knowledge.
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Old 08-19-2011, 10:21 AM
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Originally Posted by rrritchey View Post
Hi,
The SuperSwitch is a mechanical switch and if a mechanical switch fails, it fails open. This is why you always run two mechanical switches, one for each battery. I will say that we have been selling these since 2003 and have had zero failures to my knowledge.
Hi Mr. Ritchey:
Thank you for your response. I have heard good things with respect to your switches
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Old 03-03-2012, 07:24 AM
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HI THERE :-)
DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT IS THE MAX PEAK CURRENT, THE SUPER SWITCH CAN HANDLE?
THANKS :-)
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Old 03-04-2012, 11:15 AM
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HI THERE :-)
DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT IS THE MAX PEAK CURRENT, THE SUPER SWITCH CAN HANDLE?
THANKS :-)
There is really no such thing as "Maximum Peak Current" unless you are talking about the voltage where arcing would start, which would be in the hundreds of volts. The switch can handle very high currents for short periods of time. You just loose more voltage across the contacts the more current you put through the switch. The only meaningful thing to ask is the maximum continuous current you can run through the switch for an unlimited time which is much, much lower than a peak current.
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Old 03-04-2012, 01:41 PM
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Originally Posted by rrritchey View Post
There is really no such thing as "Maximum Peak Current" unless you are talking about the voltage where arcing would start, which would be in the hundreds of volts. The switch can handle very high currents for short periods of time. You just loose more voltage across the contacts the more current you put through the switch. The only meaningful thing to ask is the maximum continuous current you can run through the switch for an unlimited time which is much, much lower than a peak current.

And that is?
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Old 03-05-2012, 07:50 AM
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And that is?
Maximum continuous current is 5A. A 40%+ plane should not draw more than a couple amps on the ground with the engine running, this is the worst case static condition.
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Old 03-06-2012, 06:13 AM
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Maximum continuous current is 5A. A 40%+ plane should not draw more than a couple amps on the ground with the engine running, this is the worst case static condition.
I have used the Smart-fly switch for years with no failures. One switch per battery.
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