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Old 09-29-2014, 08:30 AM
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Ceramic Plated Cylinder Block?

What the heck is that? It's in one of the banner ads today. I guess a titanium Piston shaft would fit in it?
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Old 09-29-2014, 09:28 AM
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If its got chrome muffler bearings included Ill take two.
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Old 09-29-2014, 10:40 AM
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I would guess the cylinder is ceramic coated as opposed to chrome for the wear surface.
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Old 09-29-2014, 10:47 AM
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Yep, I assumed that also... I just think that foreign companies should ALWAYS get their ads reviewed by someone who actually lives in the country where they want to sell products.
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Old 10-02-2014, 10:07 AM
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The Russians are about the only ones I know doing ceramic coated model engine cylinder walls. They were making cylinders for a number of model engine companies. Fox Manufacturing was using them in their Fox .35 stunt and .60 stunt CL engines. I think some of the Russian engines like Fora, Cyclon and such might be using ceramic cylinders on some of their engines too. There might be some gasoline engines that use it, but usually they all go for Nikasil or something instead.

NV-Engines uses something similar if not the same with their engines too. But they make the engines in Russia so they are probably near whoever does the ceramic coatings.

There is a USA firm that does ceramic coatings, but they primarily only deal with the government and NASA for business. They would be too expensive to get to make model engine cylinders. But they could if someone wanted to pay the price.
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Last edited by earlwb; 10-02-2014 at 10:07 AM. Reason: typo correction
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Old 10-02-2014, 10:13 AM
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My company does ceramic coatings on aluminum parts that go into silicon wafer manufacturing equipment... but nothing for model airplanes.
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Old 10-02-2014, 12:03 PM
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GP engines claim to have ceramic coated cylinders.
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Old 10-02-2014, 12:18 PM
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its typically Nikasil but there are other that are titanium, or tungsten based
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Old 10-02-2014, 12:28 PM
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Found this in my Dieselnet files:

Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were originally developed and commercialized for gas turbine and jet engine applications. Many investigations have been conducted on various aspects of applying such coatings to the walls of combustion chamber in internal combustion engines. The prime objective which has been sought is to achieve higher thermal efficiencies by reduction of heat rejection from the combustion chamber. Experiments with diesel and gasoline engines suggest that thin coatings produce higher engine efficiency than thick coatings, in spite of being less effective as heat insulators [Wong 1995]. This behavior of ceramic coatings has not been satisfactorily explained. It is believed that some detailed heat transfer characteristics must have a more profound effect on thermodynamic efficiency than the overall heat rejection rate from the engine.
Several ceramic materials such as zirconium oxide, chromium oxide, aluminum oxide, and mullite have been investigated as in-cylinder engine coatings. Zirconia, thanks to its low thermal conductivity and its thermal expansion coefficient which is compatible with that of metals, has become the preferred and most studied material. Ceramic coatings can be deposited by plasma spraying or from a ceramic slurry. The thermal spraying technique using a plasma torch has been used most extensively for this purpose. In the plasma spray process zirconia is fed as a powder into the plasma stream of the torch where it is melted at temperatures as high as 16,000C. The high pressure plasma gas stream propels the molten particles onto the coated surface where they solidify. Powder and process parameters are used to control the structure and properties of the coating. The thickness of coatings can range from 0.05 to 2 mm. The optimal thickness of realistic materials is usually below 0.5 mm. Thin coatings were reported to exhibit both better performance and durability.
Besides improved thermal efficiency, advantages of ceramic coatings which have been proposed include improved engine durability, reduction in erosion and corrosion, less internal friction, lowered noise and reductions in exhaust emissions. A lot of work has been done on evaluating the effects of in-cylinder coatings on diesel engine performance and emissions. The results have been inconclusive and often contradictory. While most of published studies [Assanis 1991] [Winkler 1993] report potential emission benefits, some [Jackson 1993] [Tree 1996] claim that the coatings have detrimental effects on fuel mixing and combustion, thus, deteriorating the performance and emissions. There is a significant variability in the coating effect between different engine types. The emission benefit of coatings appears to be related to their enhancing effect on the thermal efficiency of the engine. Therefore, higher emission effectiveness of coatings may have been possible in older technology engines which were characterized by relatively low thermal efficiency.
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