logo
Thread Tools
Old 11-15-2019, 03:19 PM
tom wheeler is online now
Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Registered User
tom wheeler's Avatar
United States, MI, Auburn Hills
Joined Apr 2006
1,453 Posts
Ron and I started out the day removing the fuse side "ladder" structures from our building boards. Everything looked great in that they were straight, true and strong.

Ron then went on to putting together our "biscuit" joined building surfaces. After they were clamped and strapped together, Ron then went on to make sure they were totally level and without any warpage by using shims, levels and long heavy straight edges.

Next he laid the top fuse plans on the building surface and made some new drawings that extend the fuse tube location in order for us to accurately place our new stab tube location jigs in position.

While Ron was doing that, I started to work on the fuse sheeting. Cam includes 10 sheets of 1/8 x 4 x 48" balsa that has one side labeled as "true edge", this is the edge that becomes the center line of each fuse and you use edge to make up each of the two, 4 piece fuse sides.

I weighed and labeled each sheet and then assigned a location for each sheet so that each fuse side would weigh the same and in the case for a 200 powered aircraft, the heaviest sheets would go to the aft end of the aircraft for ease of balancing the CG latter.

My next step was to cut 30 degree scarf joints in the sheeting, then match, tape them together and then fold and edge glue them together with Titebond I. The two edge glued fuse side were then sandwich between two of our heavy building boards, weights on top and left to cure.

Tom
tom wheeler is online now Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Old 11-19-2019, 01:47 PM
tom wheeler is online now
Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Registered User
tom wheeler's Avatar
United States, MI, Auburn Hills
Joined Apr 2006
1,453 Posts
Yesterday I was unable to work as our furnace needed to be repaired, but that did stop Ron as he worked on setting up our fuse mock up.

The next goal was to exactly locate and glue in the ply wing and stab tube sleeve supports to the inside of our frame in fuse sides. This can be done as you frame in all of the 3/8" square inter fuse sides just by using the plans and carefully placing the supports where they are shown on the plans. Cam does it this way and has no issues, but we chose to "mock up" the fuse build over the plans without the fuse sheeting or those mounts yet clued in place.

Since we are doing a mock up with out any fuse sheeting, using a long straight edge we screwed in "speed angles" to the fuse line representing outside edge of the fuse structure. 1/8" balsa shims will be placed between the inter fuse frame structure and the speed angles to account for the sheeting that will be added later.

Once all of the speed angles were in place, we placed the motor box in location as per plans and figured out the angle that has to be sanded on the fuse side structure to match F1 on the motor box. Ron marked off the angle the needed to be sanded then clamped the side down on another building board and using a long bar sander shaped the leading edge of the fuse sides.

Now with the fuse sides and motor box clamped together in placed and aligned correctly to the plans, Ron also added some scrap wood sticks as temporary fuse cross bracers to keep the fuse sides flush to the speed angles. He then slipped the wing sleeve with tube inserted, (don't want to distort the sleeve) through wing tube holes in the motor box. Because the fuse sides are on an angle, the true shape of the wing tube fuse support hole has to be some what sanded on the forward outside edge of the support and also sanded on the aft inside edge of the support in order to slide on to the tube sleeve on an angle. There wasn't a whole lot of sanding needed, but if you didn't the wing sleeve could be distorted and the wing tube might not slide through easy.

Now both working together we checked first to see that the motor box and wing tube was level, and then placed weights on top of the fuse sides to keep everything flat with the board. You can see in the photo another handing little tool made by the 3D printer. Its device so we can rest a Robart Incidence meter and bar on top of a wing tube.

For the fuse stab tube supports we use our new stab tube jig to lock in the placement of the stab tube supports. This new adjustable jigs that will allow us to finely locate the placement of the stab tube horizontally so that its parallel to the wing tube and also able to vertically adjust each side so that it is also level to the wing tube as well.

With these jig/fixtures in place it was very simple to align the wing tube support and the stab tube supports. At this time we just glued and clamped wing and stab supports to the fuse rails. The wing and stab tube sleeves will not be glued until have the fuse sides sheeted and glue in all of the cross bracing. The jigs will remain where they are now, so once the fuse is all built up, the sleeves, tubes will be placed back in the jig, then the sleeves will be glued to the fuse structure.

After the epoxied stab and wing tube supports cured to the fuse frame, the next step was to use Titebond II to glue the sheeting to the fuse.
As mentioned earlier for this aircraft the heavier end of the fuse sheeting was used at the rear of the fuse for reasons of CG. After we glued the sheeting in place, we laid hard wood rails over the newly laminated fuse sides then placed our hardwood planks over the rails and weights over them and left to cure.

Another item that Ron started yesterday and we finished today was to fabricate a canister mount from light ply.

This was all we could do today as we need to let the fuse side cure before attaching them to the motorbox.

Tom
tom wheeler is online now Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-20-2019, 10:23 AM
OPflying is offline
Find More Posts by OPflying
Registered User
United States, FL, Orange Park
Joined Feb 2018
45 Posts
Hi Tom, looking forward to another build and to see what you guys can do with a 3d printer. I'm nearly done with my Dalton and plan a new big build but I want to piece together a vacuum bag system for sheeting since I will be building on a regular basis now.

Brian

Brian
OPflying is offline Find More Posts by OPflying
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-20-2019, 02:15 PM
tom wheeler is online now
Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Registered User
tom wheeler's Avatar
United States, MI, Auburn Hills
Joined Apr 2006
1,453 Posts
Ron and I removed the sheeted fuse sides, flushed up all of the sheeting to the fuse frames and cut the stab and wing tube holes.

Again we mocked up the fuse to the motor box, inserted the wing and stab tubes making sure everything lined up with the plans. With the help of our stab tube location tool and the our custom Robart tube supports, we were able to measure that both tubes were parallel to each other and both perpendicular to the fuse vertical and horizontal center line.

When we were stratified with all of the fitment criteria, we then used Titebond II to glue fuse sides to the motor box. We followed by using our handy cross brace cutting guide to make accurate balsa stick cross braces.

Tomorrow we will cut and glue in all of diangle cross braces to the top and bottom of the fuse.

Because we are only making one aircraft this time, we find ourselves now having to wait for glue to cure before going on to the next step. In previous builds, we simply worked on the second aircraft while the first one was curing.

Brian, we too are looking forward to find tools, parts and processes made possible with the 3D printer....so far its all good.

Tom
tom wheeler is online now Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-20-2019, 03:07 PM
VisionAerobatics is offline
Find More Posts by VisionAerobatics
Vision Aerobatics
VisionAerobatics's Avatar
United States, FL, Clearwater
Joined Sep 2019
80 Posts
Great work as usual
VisionAerobatics is offline Find More Posts by VisionAerobatics
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-21-2019, 01:21 PM
tom wheeler is online now
Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Registered User
tom wheeler's Avatar
United States, MI, Auburn Hills
Joined Apr 2006
1,453 Posts
Thanks John for your comment.

I had an appointment this morning, but Ron continued on. He was able to attach the rear motor box to fuse formers and also cut and glue in all of diangle fuse braces.

Tomorrow we will recheck wing and stab to locations and epoxy carbon fiber tube sleeves in place.

Tom
tom wheeler is online now Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-21-2019, 02:33 PM
VisionAerobatics is offline
Find More Posts by VisionAerobatics
Vision Aerobatics
VisionAerobatics's Avatar
United States, FL, Clearwater
Joined Sep 2019
80 Posts
You bet. No doubt you have the best detail in building and posting to help people with many ideas while building their own projects.
VisionAerobatics is offline Find More Posts by VisionAerobatics
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-22-2019, 03:43 PM
OPflying is offline
Find More Posts by OPflying
Registered User
United States, FL, Orange Park
Joined Feb 2018
45 Posts
Tom, nearly done with that 42% Dalton Extra 260. I'm going to get some much needed flying in tomorrow and I plan to spend the evening Saturday and all day Sunday covering the wings and finish up small details with the fuse and all that will be left is painting the hatch, cowling, and wheel pants.

I've been pretty occupied with work and my wife had her Gal Bladder out three weeks ago and had some minor complications afterwards.

Some time after the first of the year I plan to select another kit to build and sell turn key so I decided on the Kam Aero Extra 300. I sent them a message but I haven't received a response yet. I think there will be a few guys at the club field that would be very intrigued with the kits quality.

Build is looking good as usual.

Brian
OPflying is offline Find More Posts by OPflying
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-22-2019, 04:08 PM
tom wheeler is online now
Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Registered User
tom wheeler's Avatar
United States, MI, Auburn Hills
Joined Apr 2006
1,453 Posts
Brian, hope your wife is getting better.

As for the Kam Aero you will not be disappointed, kit quality second to none. I'm sure Can will get back to you soon, it's hunting season....

Ron and I worked today plus Ralph came by for visit, we got much done. Our report will come out in the morning, had to get to Roush to get my driving assignment for tonight.

Tom
tom wheeler is online now Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-22-2019, 09:58 PM
DGrant is online now
Find More Posts by DGrant
Just havin' fun!
DGrant's Avatar
United States, CA, Clovis
Joined Apr 2006
573 Posts
I'm leaning heavy to the Kam Aero at this point myself. I've got a 100cc ARF I'm working on, and another 100cc I'm flying, but the Kam Aero is starting to really grow on me.
My next plane will be a big guy. I think I've got decent planes to compete next year, but I'm looking ahead now.

I talked to a few pilots at SW Regional Finals at Lake Havasu last weekend, and they spoke very highly of the Kam Aero, as well I saw a few at the Tuscon Shootout last month. Very nice planes, and this thread is the best manual on the planet for building one!

Will be following progress on this next KA as well.

(PS... I took first place in the SW Regional Points Series this year in Basic(first year in IMAC)... so... I think there's something in my future in IMAC, it was just too fun!... I'm hooked!!)
DGrant is online now Find More Posts by DGrant
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-22-2019, 09:59 PM
STLAV8R is offline
Find More Posts by STLAV8R
Team Twisted!
STLAV8R's Avatar
United States, MO, St Louis
Joined Mar 2006
5,663 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom wheeler View Post
Brian, hope your wife is getting better.

As for the Kam Aero you will not be disappointed, kit quality second to none. I'm sure Can will get back to you soon, it's hunting season....

Ron and I worked today plus Ralph came by for visit, we got much done. Our report will come out in the morning, had to get to Roush to get my driving assignment for tonight.

Tom
Tom, how does the Kam Aero compare to a Carden and Dalton?
STLAV8R is offline Find More Posts by STLAV8R
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-23-2019, 07:29 AM
OPflying is offline
Find More Posts by OPflying
Registered User
United States, FL, Orange Park
Joined Feb 2018
45 Posts
Tom, she is nearly back to her old self again finally and goes back to work soon. Cam did get back with me and I will be getting in touch again later Saturday afternoon.


Brian

Quote:
Originally Posted by tom wheeler View Post
Brian, hope your wife is getting better.

As for the Kam Aero you will not be disappointed, kit quality second to none. I'm sure Can will get back to you soon, it's hunting season....

Ron and I worked today plus Ralph came by for visit, we got much done. Our report will come out in the morning, had to get to Roush to get my driving assignment for tonight.

Tom
OPflying is offline Find More Posts by OPflying
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-23-2019, 12:29 PM
tom wheeler is online now
Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Registered User
tom wheeler's Avatar
United States, MI, Auburn Hills
Joined Apr 2006
1,453 Posts
Yesterdays report today....

Brain, glad your wife is feeling better, Dale thanks for your comment about our builds, and John as for the difference between the Dalton, Carden and Kam Aero, they are all great sequence aircraft and you can't go wrong with them or the JTEC kits.

Here is what I can tell you of my experience with these aircraft, the Kam Aero fly optimum precision flying speed seems lower then the other kits, so it gives you more time in a line to insure your track and figures present in the best possible manner with the smallest work load. In terms of building, the Kam Aero has the best quality wood I have ever seen in any kit and its been the same for all five Kam Aero Kits we have built. What also is true, the part fit and matching plans is also the best I have ever experienced in my 30 years and 300+ kits built.

Now back to the build, Ron and I put the carbon fiber wing and stab sleeves back in the fuse and remeasured to make sure they were still true, straight, parallel and perpendicular before we epoxied them in place.

While they were curing, we made up the tail wheel mount and epoxied it in place as well.

Now it was on to weighing and marking all of the sheeting, this can take some time, but it definitely is worthwhile. What is very nice and somewhat unique with the Kam Aero's is that there is "C" grain balsa for the wing sheeting and "A" grain balsa for the rest of the aircraft. "C" grain is perfect for wings as its strength is in its span whereas the "A" is easier to bend around shapes like turtle decks and such.

Another great point about Kam Aero's is that the balsa quality is great and the weights and number of sheets at a particular weight are part of the design. As example the kit comes with 26-1/16 x 4 x 48" true edged "C" grain sheets. Each wing panel, top and bottom gets six and a half sheets. So by design there are equal number of sheets in the 26-28 gm, 23-25gm and the 20 to 22 gram. This is done so you assign the heaviest "C" grain sheets to be over and under the wing tube for load strength and the lighter fore and aft of those sheets.

Because of this, after weighing the wing sheets it was very simple to make up the four sheeting wing bundles of equal weight, in this case each wing bundle came to 146gm.

There also is, 31, 1/16 x 4 x 48 true edged "A" grain lighter weight sheeting that is used for the 12" scarfed in wing tip sheeting and for all of the other sheeting needs like tail surfaces, belly pans and turtle decks.
The weight of the "A" sheeting was extremely close to each other, 16 to 20gr with the vast majority 17 or 18 grams.

With the fuse sleeves cured, we pulled the fuse out of our jig and started to fabricate our sliding radio equipment tray system and other internal fuse structures, more to come on Monday.

Tom
tom wheeler is online now Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Last edited by tom wheeler; 11-23-2019 at 12:35 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-29-2019, 03:07 PM
tom wheeler is online now
Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Registered User
tom wheeler's Avatar
United States, MI, Auburn Hills
Joined Apr 2006
1,453 Posts
With Thanksgiving and both of us having apointments, this is the first day we could back to doing some work.

We started out by making 1/8" balsa fuse doubler's for the elevator servo lead exits. This is done just to reinforce the sheeting so that in time it will not crack with the constant connecting the servo leads. We used our handy servo exit guide for location, then use a Dremel to cut them out.

We like to get as much of the radio gear mounting and supporting hardware in the airframe before moving on to sheeting. Luck's aircraft will have easy adjustable CG by using carbon fiber tubes (rails) running forward and aft so that the radio/battery tray can slide to adjust the CG. Because this aircraft will have a DA200, the rails run from the rear of the motor box to vertical fuse braces one bay aft of the front of the turtle deck. We made the front and rear supports out of 1/4" light ply.

We also were able to sheet what will be the top and sides of the canister tunnel. Next we made little 1/16" balsa catch trays that will go outboard of the motor box to the fuse sides for the first two bay so that when you at the field, wing nuts, bolts or anything else will not fall down to the bottom of the fuse.

One of the many nice features on the JTEC kits is the rear fuse access hatch. This allow you to help fish servo wires when your doing the first install. But another great feature is those times out in the field and your just ready hook up your elevator servo extensions and one or both of the fuse extension has fallen inside...what a pain.... With the addition of this service hatch, its not a problem at all. The hatch we made is 1/8" light ply, the mounting tabs are the same.

Tom
tom wheeler is online now Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-30-2019, 02:37 PM
tom wheeler is online now
Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Registered User
tom wheeler's Avatar
United States, MI, Auburn Hills
Joined Apr 2006
1,453 Posts
Ron and I got together today to start making up all of the sheeting. Since we had all of the sheeting pre-weighed and marked it was easy to allocate the wood per location. First up was the canopy hatch area, then the fin/rudder. While I was cutting and making up the panels, Ron was edge gluing them with Titebond I. With these panels taped and glued, they were placed under hard wood boards and weighted so they would cure flat and true.

Next I made up the sheeting for the turtle deck, forward and aft belly pans. Because these panel require a great deal of bending to form to the foam parts, not only did we tape the seams with wide 3M tape, but also perpendicular to the edge tape. This really helps on heavily curved sheeting to smooth the sheeting and keep it from cracking or splitting during the vacuum curing phase.

The stab sheeting was our last panels to make today. All of the sheeting made today was edged glued and weighted down to cure flat. When we get back next week we will make up the wing sheeting and start vacuum bagging every thing.

Tom
tom wheeler is online now Find More Posts by tom wheeler
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message


Quick Reply
Message:


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 5 (4 members and 1 guests)
Surfer Dude, rsnow, tom wheeler, highonthai
Thread Tools